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TOPIC: Learning Progression

Learning Progression 4 months 2 weeks ago #85

When I first powered up it felt as if the rig was going to literally take off without me so I really dropped hard in the harness and had to really drive my feet down to keep from catapulting and white knuckled the boom. The speed was like none I had experienced earlier in the day. I felt as if I was in a position where I was locked in and if I had tried to let the sail out or unhooked it would have catapulted me to the moon. Fastest I'd been on the water except for the 2 seater ice boat my dad had back in the 70's. We used to sail it at Wolf. It was like a dragster when it was fully loaded up with wind. The blades on the back probably weighed in at 25lbs each and the front one was even heavier. You talk about speed! I remember hearing the blades cutting into the ice as we slowly headed out and once it powered up what a rush!


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Learning Progression 4 months 2 weeks ago #86

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So we are talking about different things then. What you are describing sounds like the surge of power that you are experiencing the most when a gust fils up the sail after a lull. In this case it is the front arm that holds the throttle . You pull with your front arm only , the sail oppens and the power gets spilled out-you sheet out, you push with your front arm , you sheet in and power up. I cant believe I haven’t told you about this before! It’s fundamental , but after a while you start doing things automatically and forget how important they are. The little details that matter!

Learning Progression 4 months 19 hours ago #87

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Posted this initially in the last Wolf session thread, but probably you haven’t seen it so I’m posting it again here where it belongs. It’s a cutout from a bigger article by Guy Cribb, who is a one of the best UK couches and if you google him you’ll find other useful information too. If you haven’t quite grasp the importance of the power controlling front arm from my broken English I hope this peace will make it clearer. As I said it sounds very complicated -feet, hands, torso and head doing different things at exactly the same time and it is complicated, but with time our brains memorise it and starts giving the commands independently -like auto pilot-some call it “muscle memory “. In a view years you’ll be able to carve jibe while checking your emails at the same time :lol: Well, not exactly, but very close. Unfortunately it takes a long time for us “weekend warriors “ because we forget most of what we’ve learned the last session by the time we get to sail again.

Learning Progression 3 months 3 weeks ago #88

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Yesterday me and Reid did some on land experimenting by swapping our masts. It was a very educating experience for me for I knew that Ezzy and Sailworks sails look very different on land and use masts with different bend curves, but I didn’t know that they have to be rigged very differently too! While my Sailworks /both the Retros and the Revos/ are rigged by applying significant downhaul and moderate outhaul, Reid showed me how the Ezzy’s are rigged the exactly opposite way. The amount of outhaul he applyed was eye popping for me . It takes considerable effort and the sail gets pulled out significantly from neutral position. I would call that a killer outhaul, because it will completely kill the power in most sails rendering them unusable. Quite the opposite in an Ezzy sail, Reid explained, it merely shifts the draft of the sail forward and around the sailor to create the desired equal pull in both arms.
All of this means that if I’ve showed you how to rig your Ezzy, I certainly did it wrong. So next time you rig an Ezzy sail let the printed settings guide you and trim additionaly by feel until you achieve equal pressure in both arms.

Learning Progression 3 months 3 weeks ago #89

Ady wrote:
Ezzy’s are rigged the exactly opposite way. The amount of outhaul he applyed was eye popping for me . It takes considerable effort and the sail gets pulled out significantly from neutral position. I would call that a killer outhaul, because it will completely kill the power in most sails rendering them unusable. Quite the opposite in an Ezzy sail, Reid explained, it merely shifts the draft of the sail forward and around the sailor to create the desired equal pull in both arms.
All of this means that if I’ve showed you how to rig your Ezzy, I certainly did it wrong.


I rigged my 5.8 Ezzy with 3" of positive outhaul the medium setting(black cord, see vid). The "considerable effort" was just me trying to get out that last 1/8" so the sail touches the boom - more to do with the loop & go on the boom, so I don't have to click the boom out one more notch and keep the boom as short as possible.

We did learn that my GT 100 constant curve appears it won't work in Sailworks.


Learning Progression 2 months 11 hours ago #90



Well I hope I just dropped Gregorys Jibe video here as I want to access it for future reference.
Looking at my last post I don't think I added my last Wolf Lake adventure back in September. My intention was to get on and off plane and into the straps under some type of control without worrying about blasting across the lake. I was getting on plane but was still putting my foot to close to the mast base initially and not able to get it back in the strap. I got tossed out the front window a few times and was having trouble with wind gusts. This seems to be an ongoing problem that I need to try to get under control, it makes for a long day. I decided to break for lunch and go with a 6.0 but I was still underestimating the wind gusts and this was just as bad as the 6.5 so I eventually went with my 5.5. It ended up being a long day on and mostly in the water. I think Ady arrived sometime around 1 and as I was leaving around 3ish (?) I caught up with him as he was rigging another kit. He gave me some good instruction (on land) regarding that front foot/strap position that will help next time I hit the water. If I can swing it I'd like to hit Bonaire for a week or so this winter. Here's a few shots from last time out....

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Learning Progression 1 month 10 hours ago #91

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Good stuff to read while waisting away time at work ;)
www.windsurf.co.uk/peter-hart-filling-in-the-gaps/
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Ideally following up on the water.
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